Nov
7
(506 Views / 0 Upvotes)
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I highlighted what I believe are strong angles of attack since Western media constantly violates these areas.

I think waiting until filming costs have been sunk before reporting is optimal to inflict maximum damage. Harsh lessons will educate them quicker.

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Beijing (AFP) - China passed a restrictive and long-discussed film law on Monday banning content deemed harmful to the “dignity, honour and interests” of the People’s Republic and encouraging the promotion of “socialist core values”.

Booming box-office receipts have drawn Hollywood studios and a growing Chinese filmmaking industry into fierce competition for the Asian giant’s movie market, which PricewaterhouseCoopers projects will rise from $4.3 billion in 2014 to $8.9 billion in 2019 – outstripping the US.

The new set of laws govern the promotion of the film industry and were approved by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee at their meeting in the capital Monday.

The law states that its aim is to “spread core socialist values”, enrich the masses’ spiritual and cultural life, and set ground rules for the industry.

It forbids content that stirs up opposition to the law or constitution, harms national unity, sovereignty or territorial integrity, exposes national secrets, harms Chinese security, dignity, honour or interests, or spreads terrorism or extremism.
 

Also banned are subjects that “defame the people’s excellent cultural traditions”, incite ethnic hatred or discrimination or destroy ethnic unity.

It is also illegal for Chinese firms to hire or partner with overseas productions deemed to have views “harmful to China’s dignity, honour and interests, harm social stability or hurt the feelings of the Chinese people”.

 
The Communist Party fiercely criticises governments and public figures who have expressed sympathy for the Dalai Lama, previously the darling of Hollywood celebrities such as Brad Pitt.

Companies that work on such content face fines up to five times their illegal earnings over 500,000 yuan, it said.

Films must not “violate the country’s religious policies, spread cults, or superstitions”,

insult or slander people.

The law comes into effect on March 1 next year.

Only 34 foreign films are given cinema releases each year under a quota set by Beijing, and all are subject to official censorship of content deemed politically sensitive or obscene.

To get around restrictions, Hollywood studios looking to capitalise on China’s burgeoning market have sought partnerships with local companies.

Co-produced movies can bypass the quota as long as they contain significant Chinese elements, such as characters, plot devices or locations.

The new laws also propose fines for those who provide false box office sales data, a widespread problem as firms have been exposed pumping up ticket sales to generate marketing buzz.

China passes restrictive new film law:
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/china-passes-restrictive-film-law-085247826–finance.html

What do you guys think?

Nov
2
(155 Views / 0 Upvotes)
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Mulan can save China on her own

Hollywood needs to stop pushing white male heroes on us

At 20 years old, I finally watched Mulan for the first time. I was instantly enamoured with this strong heroine who aimed to bring honour to her family by doing the unthinkable: posing as a boy to go fight in a war against the Huns, so that her sick father could stay home and rest.

Beyond the fact that Mulan is a powerful heroine, she is also Chinese. As a Chinese-Canadian, I love that. To see someone who looks like me as a kick-ass protagonist exuding confidence and strength is incredibly empowering. However, I’m worried that upcoming generations of Chinese Canadians won’t be able to witness leading characters who share their identity.

The new live-action Mulan, slated to hit theatres in 2018, initially considered pushing Mulan aside in favour of a white male fighting to save China. The first script, written by Lauren Hynek and Elizabeth Martin, saw a “30-something European trader [. . .] help the Chinese Imperial Army [. . .] because he sets eyes on Mulan,” according to the blog Angry Asian Man.

Here’s my confusion: two women wrote the first iteration of this live-action movie. As a woman, I jumped with enthusiasm as I watched the animated Mulan save Li Shang, the emperor, and basically all of China from the yellow-eyed Huns.

Shouldn’t these women be celebrating these heroic actions by at least retaining the female hero in their retelling? Why was “heroism” automatically given back to men, while women were again stuck waiting for rescue? And beyond gender, what happened to having heroes of different ethnicities?

Hollywood evidently doesn’t consider these questions, or see the issue the same way that many of its consumers do. Since 2007, “characters from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups were 26.3 percent of all characters” in the top 100 Hollywood films, according to USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Further, Fusion Media reports that only 6.6 percent of main cast members across over 100 American network TV are of Asian descent.

There’s a massive gap in our media discourse as far as featuring heroes of colour is concerned — which is incredibly problematic, because not all heroes are white.

Time after time, Chinese characters find themselves stuck in the stereotypes of foreigners (usually with a difficult-to-understand accent), martial arts gurus, oversexualized females, asexual males, or subordinate nerds — not to mention restaurant owners, housekeepers, and suspicious shopkeepers, as musician and writer Zak Keith argues. Even when a heroic role is supposed to be Chinese, Hollywood finds a way to cast the whitest person possible and pass them off as Chinese. (I’m talking to you, Emma Stone.)

This live-action Mulan has the potential to break down these stereotypes and begin the first step towards properly including minorities as heroes. As of late, the script is being updated by Jurassic World writers Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver, with a promise of a global casting call to find a Chinese female lead as well as Chinese actors for the other roles.

As a Chinese girl who has come to love how strong the character of Mulan is, the last thing I want to see on opening day is the likes of Matt Damon or (God forbid) Brad Pitt seducing a young and helpless Chinese girl. To quote an articulate tweet from Asian American actor and writer Anna Akana: “We don’t need a white man to save China in Mulan. That’s what Mulan is for. That’s literally her role.”

Save your pretty white boy arsenal for another day, Hollywood. Bring honour to us all and make Mulan Chinese, and right.

http://www.the-peak.ca/2016/11/mulan-can-save-china-on-her-own/

Nov
2
(162 Views / 0 Upvotes)
0 Replies

The Walking Dead: Glenn actor Steven Yeun says playing an Asian-American role model was the “greatest honour”

The Walking Dead lost one of its original characters last week, with the death of Glenn Rhee.

In the last seven years, Steven Yeun’s Glenn has become a beloved staple on the show - made all the more special by the fact that he was a rare Asian-American character who:

  1. was portrayed as a genuine and relatable hero;

  2. was not racially stereotyped nor defined by his ethnicity.

Glenn is a huge, huge loss to those looking for Asian-American role models on TV, especially when you consider how few of them actually exist.

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Yeun said it was the “greatest honour” to play a character like him.

“I didn’t have a Glenn,” Yeun said, recalling his childhood. "I didn’t have someone to watch on television. I didn’t have someone where I can say, ‘That’s my face, and my face is being accepted by everybody watching this programme’.

http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/the-walking-dead/news/a812606/walking-dead-glenn-steven-yeun-on-playing-asian-american-role-model/

Oct
31
(601 Views / 1 Upvotes)
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The following happened over 1.5 years ago.

Jarred Ha was the victim of assaults by white female college rugby players and a white national guard. In both cases, he was the one being assaulted by white attackers.

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Jarred with close up of large scar [left], racist white attacker Graham Harper [right]

The Western media spins the story around to paint Jarred Ha as the aggressor and the whites, the national guard in particular, as a “hero”.

Here is an in-depth analysis by an Asian woman.

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In January 2015, a University of Washington (UW) junior named Jarred Ha was involved in a violent incident with Maddison Story, a female UW student (and rugby player) and Graham Harper, a male UW student. Before the incident occurred, Ha and Story were tenants of the same apartment building. According to Ha, Story “routinely took up two parking spots, which had become a sore subject among the other tenants.” When he saw her outside a dorm where many UW rugby players resided, he approached her and suggested that she needed “to park straighter.”
 
Depending on whom you ask, what happened afterwards varies significantly. But it is undisputed that a fight broke out between the two after Ha made the comment. Soon, multiple female UW rugby players (four, according to Ha) and eventually Harper joined the fight against Ha. Ultimately, Ha ended up using his knife against Harper. The knife was “a Karambit . . . with a curved, 2 ¼ inch fixed blade” that he had received from his father as a gift for self defense purposes. When 911 was called, Harper was found with stab wounds and cuts on his left leg, chest, and groin. His abdomen was punctured, “causing a small section of intestine to protrude.”
 
Unlike the media coverage of this incident, which focused on the disputed violence between Harper and Ha, this blog entry focuses on UW’s unequal treatment of the three students. In particular, it criticizes UW for failing to discipline Story and Harper in the same manner as Ha when evidence suggests the two were complicit in this violent incident. In fact, Ha was the only student who supported his story with two unbiased witnesses.
 
Story and Harper are White. Ha is Asian.

[click link for more]

UW’s Unequal Treatment of Student-to-Student Violence: The Case of Jarred Ha | Michigan Journal of Race & Law:
https://mjrl.org/2016/06/09/uws-unequal-treatment-of-student-to-student-violence-the-case-of-jarred-ha/

 

Here’s an example of the Western media.

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National Guard reservist Graham Harper stabbed six times protecting woman | Daily Mail Online:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2938837/UW-student-19-National-Guard-reservist-stabbed-six-times-protecting-woman-punched-face-man-stole-parking-space.html

 

Finally, the “justice” system punished Jarred, the victim and none of the white attackers.

 
While still in jail, Ha was notified that he was suspended from the UW and barred from campus.
 
Ha said he has attended academic disciplinary hearings and was ordered to take an alcohol safety class. He has been told by the UW that he can reapply in the fall, but he hopes to get back in before then. No one else involved in the fight faced disciplinary action, said Ha’s defense
team.
 
Ha, who moved back into his parents’ Bellevue home after they bailed him out of jail, hopes to return to school for the spring quarter. Norm Arkans, the UW’s associate vice president for media relations, said federal privacy laws prevent him from commenting on Ha’s status.
 
“My brother got everything taken away from him — his schooling, his friends, his life was just completely put on hold,” said Ha’s older sister, Vanessa, who graduated from the UW in 2012. “It’s just so unfair.”
 
When Vanessa attended the UW, her father, Joe Ha, became alarmed by the frequent safety alerts his daughter received on her cellphone from UW police. He gave her the choice of carrying a Taser, mace or a knife for protection. She chose mace.

Cleared after stabbing, former UW student wants his life back | The Seattle Times:
http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/crime/cleared-after-stabbing-ex-uw-student-wants-his-life-back/

It’s worth noting that this racist national guard has an Asian girlfriend.

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When Asians highly distrust Asian women with white men, this is exactly why.

Bottom line is that in a white society, don’t ever think the justice system is there for you. There are many other instances of outrageous injustice such as Vincent Chin, Chai Vang, all the many rapes and murders of specifically Asian women by white men that were ruled “not racially motivated”, setc. These are not isolated incidents.

Oct
26
(164 Views / 0 Upvotes)
0 Replies

Asian American groups meet with Fox News personnel over awful Jesse Watters segment

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) and other advocacy groups met Tuesday with two officials from Fox News to discuss an Oct. 3 segment in which Fox News’s Jesse Watters interviewed people in New York’s Chinatown about U.S. politics and other matters. The segment played up commonly traded Asian stereotypes and subjected non-English-speaking Chinatown passersby to ridicule.

The backlash was strong, as critics on social media and elsewhere took issue with the particulars of the video as well as the sensibilities that drove it. “The segment was billed as a report on Chinese Americans’ views on the U.S. presidential election but it was rife with racist stereotypes, drew on thoughtless tropes and openly ridiculed Asian Americans,” reads a statement from AAJA. The organization demanded an apology. On Twitter, Watters himself said, “My man-on-the-street interviews are meant to be taken as tongue-in-cheek and I regret if anyone found offense.”

In an interview with colleague Chris Wallace, Bill O’Reilly — Watters’ boss — denied that the segment had gone “over the line.” Complaints about the bit were the work of an “organized campaign,” said O’Reilly.

Paul Cheung, president of AAJA, told the Erik Wemple Blog that the meeting was “productive.” “I think they heard what the community’s reactions are,” he said of the session at New York’s Museum of Chinese in America. Approximately 130 Asian American “groups and allies” have signed an open letter to Fox News regarding the unfortunate episode, said Cheung.

Ron Kim, a New York state assemblyman in attendance, told this blog that a representative from “The O’Reilly Factor” and a senior representative from the news side of the channel attended the meeting. Together they played a “good cop, bad cop” routine, said Kim. “The gentleman from O’Reilly’s show was defending what they were doing and trying to explain that this is a part of the opinion section of Fox News and sometimes edgy humor can go too far,” said Kim.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple/wp/2016/10/25/asian-american-groups-meet-with-fox-news-personnel-over-awful-jesse-watters-segment/?utm_term=.2e6103758e81

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