Dec
10
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Edward Snowden’s decision to leak information about classified U.S. surveillance programs set back the Pentagon’s push to recruit cybersecurity experts, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said.
 
“There’s no question that Snowden set it back,” Carter said of the effort to attract top talent from tech companies in Silicon Valley and beyond for cybersecurity positions.
 
“It created a tremendous amount of suspicion, concern, and disinclination to engage,” he aded.

Snowden, Carter, Pentagon, Cybersecurity | Defensetech:
http://www.defensetech.org/2016/11/14/snowden-hurt-push-recruit-hackers/

Lies are the foundation of white supremacy. People act because they think and believe certain things. Most people are not evil, but misled. Few would agree to “commit genocide against innocent people”, but many could be fooled into doing just that if it’s called “fighting for democracy”.

That’s why Western lies must always be exposed and their voices discredited. That causes mass distrust, disobedience, defection, and subversion against the wrong white power structures.

Dec
7
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Racial discrimination in Australia: A third of young people report race-based mistreatment

Almost a third of young people experienced unfair treatment or discrimination based on their race in the last year, Mission Australia’s youth survey has revealed.

“This is a little bit of a wake-up call for us, isn’t it?” Mission Australia’s chief executive Catherine Yeomans said.

A total 22,000 young people aged between 15 and 19 from across the country completed the survey, with 4,000 teenagers saying they spoke a language other than English at home — the most common being Chinese, Vietnamese and Arabic.

When broken down, the survey showed Mandarin-speaking young people experienced the highest rates of racial discrimination, at 90 per cent.

About 80 per cent of Cantonese and Filipino young people reported unfair treatment based on their race.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people were almost twice as likely to report having experienced racial discrimination than their non-Indigenous peers.

“There are some conversations going on in our community, or some actions being taken against young people, that are simply not right,” Ms Yeomans said.

The ABC spoke to several young Australians about their experiences.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-06/chinese-australians-racist-discrimination-asian-mandarin-vietnam/8092926

Dec
7
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‘It’s (Sexy) Asian Men!’ Hallelujah!

As an Asian-American woman, I’ve had any number of opportunities to see someone who looked like me on the big and small screen.

Since I was a little girl, I’ve seen Disney’s Mulan, Trini Kwan from Fox Kids’ Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, and Dr. Cristina Yang on Grey’s Anatomy, to name a few. And while the portrayal of Asian-American women by Hollywood and television could use some work – too often they’re over-sexualized or rendered exotic – at least we’re present and have some depth.

But Asian-American male characters have exactly the opposite problem. They’re rarely cast in the sexy, romantic roles and are more typically relegated to stereotypes or caricatures.

“That’s if Asian-American men have been portrayed at all,” Phil Yu, who runs the Angry Asian Man blog, told me. “Usually Asian-American men have been pretty much rendered invisible. But when they’re around, when you see them, it’s usually sidelined to sidekick status or probably the butt of a joke like ‘Asian Nerd,’ wimpy guys, perpetual foreigners.”

Think Long Duk Dong from the 1984 movie “Sixteen Candles.”

I by no means want to take away from the talents of Asian male pioneers in western film like Jackie Chan, Daniel Dae Kim, Bruce Lee or George Takei. But let’s be honest, they’ve all played the “perpetual foreigners.”

A new web short film called “It’s Asian Men!” looks to do away with the image of Asian-American men as weak and effeminate by spoofing a movie that’s all about male machismo: “Magic Mike.”

The film is only about 7 minutes long, credits included, but it shows a completely different side of Asian-American men from what you see in western film.

Without giving too much away, let’s just say that the movie involves a bed, a dream, and four hot Asian men. Even its soundtrack is meant to send a message. “Backup Man” by Bo Haan, one of the film’s actors, is all about the plight of the Asian-American male dating experience: always the safe choice; always the backup man.

The film left me wondering why I thought the juxtaposition of “sexy” and “Asian men” seemed strange. That happens to be the motivation behind the message the film’s creators are trying to send to Hollywood filmmakers: There are plenty of attractive, talented Asian-American men who can play the romantic leading man you’re looking for.

NaRhee Ahn, the film’s writer, director and one of its producers, says she and her all-Asian-American female crew could have cast the film many times over.

“I just really want people to notice the talent that they have as well as their good looks, because there’s a lot of actors like that available,” she said. “They just aren’t being recognized by mainstream entertainment.”

(There’s some real-world evidence that Asian-American men are less preferred by American women. Over the years, online dating website OKCupid has studied its user activity. Researchers found that Asian-American men receive far fewer “likes” and messages compared to men of other races on their site. Days before the “It’s Asian Men!” debuted, OKCupid found that that trend still holds.)

Yoshi Sudarso, the leading man in “It’s Asian Men!,” doesn’t look like any of the Hollywood stereotypes. He’s hunky with toned arms, a washboard stomach with a sweet smile and shining eyes. A stunt man-turned actor, Sudarso is probably best known for his role as the Koda on the series “Power Rangers Dino Charge.”

He was offered the part in “It’s Asian Men!” when the filmmakers asked journalist Ada Tseng for casting recommendations from her calendar, “Haikus with Hotties,” which billed itself as “a series where we ask hot Asian men to share poetry with us.” (The 2017 version will be "Haikus ON Hotties). The calendar served as the inspiration for “It’s Asian Men!” and has partnered with the film.

To be fair, RIGHT NOW is probably the best time to be an Asian-American man trying to make a career in front of the camera. There are a number of television shows with Asian-American men in significant roles, like ABC’s “Fresh off the Boat” and “Dr. Kim,” The CW’s “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and — until recently (Spoiler alert!) — AMC’s “The Walking Dead.”

And then there are all those attractive and talented male entertainers on “It’s Asian Men!”

All four of them.

But it’s getting better.

Julia Kim, a casting director and member of the Casting Society of America, told me that she’s seeing more Asian-Americans, the fastest growing ethnic group in the country, showing up for casting calls. This, she said, gives casting directors more options to take to filmmakers.

That probably has something to do with a change in culture on the Asian-American side, Kim said. Traditionally, Asian parents want their children to enter solid, stable jobs.

“And acting is such a crap shoot and is such a risky occupation or career choice,” she said. “But now that the opportunities are opening up and there’s more shots at Asian actors having a career in acting, I feel like it’s a viable option.”

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/12/06/504162855/its-sexy-asian-men-hallelujah

Dec
7
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The Truth Behind ‘Me Love You Long Time’

“Me love you long time” is a phrase often used when referring to foreign Asian women and sex. It may or may not be explicitly associated with illicit sex but the clear underlying message is that the Asian woman’s role is to sexually serve the man. She is to be docile, unassuming, exotic and demure — yet wildly sexual and uninhibited. A woman with “slanted eyes and creamy yellow thighs” (lyrics from “Asian Girlz” song) to be tamed and devoured by the white man.

If you ask anyone younger than 30 where the roots are from the line, “Me love you long time”, you’d probably get a blank stare. They may think it’s just broken English from an Asian women who is truly trying to express genuine affection to someone in English. The reality is that this phrase, “Me love you long time” is not “I love you” coming out awkwardly in an Asian accent. Instead, it’s a phrase popularized by Stanley Kubrick’s 1987 movie, Full Metal Jacket, where the line itself is taken from the scene where a Vietnamese woman propositions herself to two American GIs.

The movie’s objective was in capturing the essence and impact of the Vietnam War based on the experiences of a U.S Marines Corps platoon. The term has since become a popular part of American lexicon spoken with limited insight to the past or a desire to ignore the realities of the present.

The scene unfortunately speaks the ugly truth about collateral damage in wars, especially U.S. military occupation overseas in Asian countries. The first major American White sexual imperialism occurred during the Philippine-American War (1899-1902). The Filipinos fought from being colonized by the U.S. but 250,000 lost lives later, they succumbed to the might of America’s military. While the actual war only lasted three years, there were insurrections and rebellions along the way that kept a large number of American soldiers stationed on the island for more than a decade. Slash and burn techniques swept across villages as the country lay in waste. When the soldiers tired of wreaking havoc on the land, this same imperialistic mentality to conquer shifted to the local Filipina women who they referred to as, “little brown fucking machines powered by rice.” *

Filipino women were viewed so subservient and subordinate, not only to White men but also to White women, that U.S. soldiers sexually denigrated them in a way they would never have treated their spouses or other women back home. “Filipina sex workers, for example, frequently report ‘being treated like a toy or a pig by the American [soldiers] and being required to do ‘three holes’ – oral, vaginal and anal sex.” *

It was this American colonialization period during the turn of the 20th century that gave rise to today’s notorious sex entertainment industry in Asia. Sex and prostitution sprang up to cater to the American military amidst the backdrop of political and economic plight, despair, and poverty where a man could have “a girl for the price of a hamburger”.*

A few decades later, during the Vietnam War, this only intensified as the conflict took a long and brutal toll on the U.S. military and the American psyche back home. But on the battlefield, the mind of the fighting soldier must be protected and preserved at all costs, even at the cost of Vietnamese or Thai women and girls. Consequently, several military bases were stationed in Thailand to shelter up to 70,000 American GIs at any given time for “rest and recreation”. “With pervasive disregard for human rights, the military grimly accepts and recognizes access to indigenous women’s bodies as a ‘necessity’ for American GIs stationed overseas”. *

If the sexual oppression was to end with conclusion of the Vietnam War, it’d be relegated to an abomination from the past. But today’s flourishing sex tourism industry in Thailand (and other neighboring Asian and SE Asian countries), should be a reminder of the remnants of Western imperialism (American and European) and military presence overseas. It is “far from being a thing of the past, but is a lived experience of many”. *

Millions of tourists from Europe and the United States visit Thailand specifically for its sex industry alone (65% were single men in one study).* So while political Western colonization is absent in the Far East, it is still physically rampant in the pants of many Anglos. The desire to sexually possess, conquer, and at times humiliate a subservient Asian woman permeates our culture.

It may start off as an innocuous joke without much introspection or resistance from others; the joke then turns into a more pernicious modern-day imperialistic mentality of sexual conquest witnessed recently by the music video, “Asian Girlz” by the band Day Above Ground.

“Me love you long time” is a phrase often used when referring to foreign Asian women and sex. It may or may not be explicitly associated with illicit sex but the clear underlying message is that the Asian woman’s role is to sexually serve the man. She is to be docile, unassuming, exotic and demure — yet wildly sexual and uninhibited. A woman with “slanted eyes and creamy yellow thighs” (lyrics from “Asian Girlz” song) to be tamed and devoured by the white man.

If you ask anyone younger than 30 where the roots are from the line, “Me love you long time”, you’d probably get a blank stare. They may think it’s just broken English from an Asian women who is truly trying to express genuine affection to someone in English. The reality is that this phrase, “Me love you long time” is not “I love you” coming out awkwardly in an Asian accent. Instead, it’s a phrase popularized by Stanley Kubrick’s 1987 movie, Full Metal Jacket, where the line itself is taken from the scene where a Vietnamese woman propositions herself to two American GIs.

The movie’s objective was in capturing the essence and impact of the Vietnam War based on the experiences of a U.S Marines Corps platoon. The term has since become a popular part of American lexicon spoken with limited insight to the past or a desire to ignore the realities of the present.

The scene unfortunately speaks the ugly truth about collateral damage in wars, especially U.S. military occupation overseas in Asian countries. The first major American White sexual imperialism occurred during the Philippine-American War (1899-1902). The Filipinos fought from being colonized by the U.S. but 250,000 lost lives later, they succumbed to the might of America’s military. While the actual war only lasted three years, there were insurrections and rebellions along the way that kept a large number of American soldiers stationed on the island for more than a decade. Slash and burn techniques swept across villages as the country lay in waste. When the soldiers tired of wreaking havoc on the land, this same imperialistic mentality to conquer shifted to the local Filipina women who they referred to as, “little brown fucking machines powered by rice.” *

Filipino women were viewed so subservient and subordinate, not only to White men but also to White women, that U.S. soldiers sexually denigrated them in a way they would never have treated their spouses or other women back home. “Filipina sex workers, for example, frequently report ‘being treated like a toy or a pig by the American [soldiers] and being required to do ‘three holes’ – oral, vaginal and anal sex.” *

It was this American colonialization period during the turn of the 20th century that gave rise to today’s notorious sex entertainment industry in Asia. Sex and prostitution sprang up to cater to the American military amidst the backdrop of political and economic plight, despair, and poverty where a man could have “a girl for the price of a hamburger”.*

A few decades later, during the Vietnam War, this only intensified as the conflict took a long and brutal toll on the U.S. military and the American psyche back home. But on the battlefield, the mind of the fighting soldier must be protected and preserved at all costs, even at the cost of Vietnamese or Thai women and girls. Consequently, several military bases were stationed in Thailand to shelter up to 70,000 American GIs at any given time for “rest and recreation”. “With pervasive disregard for human rights, the military grimly accepts and recognizes access to indigenous women’s bodies as a ‘necessity’ for American GIs stationed overseas”. *

If the sexual oppression was to end with conclusion of the Vietnam War, it’d be relegated to an abomination from the past. But today’s flourishing sex tourism industry in Thailand (and other neighboring Asian and SE Asian countries), should be a reminder of the remnants of Western imperialism (American and European) and military presence overseas. It is “far from being a thing of the past, but is a lived experience of many”. *

Millions of tourists from Europe and the United States visit Thailand specifically for its sex industry alone (65% were single men in one study).* So while political Western colonization is absent in the Far East, it is still physically rampant in the pants of many Anglos. The desire to sexually possess, conquer, and at times humiliate a subservient Asian woman permeates our culture.

It may start off as an innocuous joke without much introspection or resistance from others; the joke then turns into a more pernicious modern-day imperialistic mentality of sexual conquest witnessed recently by the music video, “Asian Girlz” by the band Day Above Ground.

In their interview with TMZ, the band refused to acknowledge the racism inherent in their lyrics let alone how it could be perceived as such, “We didn’t expect it to be such a backlash.” Its lead singer says, “It comes from a good place” and “I don’t understand” of why this is inappropriate.

Beyond bewilderment, the band members were defensive saying, “We’ve all had close relationships with the Asian community, Asian people. There’s guys in the band with Asian women. It’s just, it’s hard to believe we’re getting this kind of backlash”.

Northern California Attorney Sunny Woan and author of the abstract, “White Sexual
Imperialism” tells me how this is another example of how covert racism appears in mainstream America, even if it’s under the guise of music or other forms of entertainment. “Here we have the irreverent trinity that is racism, sexism, and imperialism. The question to ask is why did the band decide on Asian women? What does it tell us about the underlying, prevailing politics of white male and Asian female relationships, even today in the 21st century.”

Woan is also the editor of Kartika Review, a national literary arts magazine that
publishes Asian Pacific Islander American fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and art. She has heard many people, particularly Asians tell her not to take a music video too seriously. But she says otherwise. “If we treat it like it’s nothing, then we are being complacent to racism, sexism, and here most pertinently, the repercussions of cultural imperialism.”

The video has since gone viral, receiving more than 1 million YouTube hits. Woan believes the song went from conception to post-production because no one spoke up against it; a cumulative consequence from men with a Eurocentric and narrow framework of relational dynamics between Asian women and White men. “It probably started with one a-little-bit-offensive-but-not-awful quip one band member made, everyone laughed and said ha-ha that’s funny, probably no one, least of all the Asian female model involved or the supposed band mate of Asian descent spoke up and said, ‘Hey, look, that’s not funny’.”

In one word, she blames this music video on complacency. Intellectual complacency from the band members but also complacency in the form of aloofness and indifference from the greater Asian-American community. If Asians truly want a voice in America then they must learn to use it, otherwise complacency will one day lead to normalcy.

  • all quotes taken from the abstract, “White Sexual Imperialism” written by Northern California attorney and editor of Kartika Review Sunny Woan.

http://nextshark.com/truth-behind-love-long-time/

Dec
7
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Sammy Lee, First Asian-American Man to Earn Olympic Gold, Dies at 96

In the golden California summers before World War II, Sammy Lee, a Korean-American, was just one of the “colored” boys in the Pasadena pool on Wednesdays. That was “International Day,” when Asian, black and Latino children were allowed to swim. After they were gone, the pool was drained and refilled with clean water for the white children who came every other day of the week.

Years later, fulfilling a vow to his father, he stood on the high diving platform at the Olympic Games in London and looked down at cheering crowds. It was like standing atop a three-story building. But he had long ago conquered his fear of heights, and of bigotry. He was a doctor and a compact athlete representing the United States.

He ran forward and rose majestically into the air.

Dr. Sammy Lee, who died of pneumonia on Friday in Newport Beach, Calif., at age 96, faced prejudice growing up, and discrimination when he tried to buy a home in a white community in Southern California. But he also became the first Asian-American man to earn Olympic gold, and the first American to win consecutive gold medals in Olympic platform diving. (The Filipino-American diver Victoria Manalo Draves won a gold medal two days before he did.)

The University of Southern California announced his death on its website.

Dr. Lee won a gold medal in 10-meter platform diving and a bronze in 3-meter springboard diving at the 1948 Olympics in London, and a gold in platform diving at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. He also won three national diving championships as a collegian in the 1940s and was named America’s outstanding amateur athlete of 1953 by the Amateur Athletic Union.
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Their Golden Years JULY 21, 2012

He became an ambassador to the Olympics for Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon and Ronald Reagan; coached Greg Louganis, Bob Webster and other American diving champions, as well as the American diving team at the 1960 Olympics in Rome; and was elected to the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1968 and the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 1990.

An ear, nose and throat specialist, Dr. Lee was an Army major and medical officer in the Korean War. But in 1955, as he ended eight years of military service, all his achievements did not spare him from racial discrimination when he tried to buy a home in Garden Grove, a booming postwar community in Orange County, where he wanted to open a medical practice. When turning him away, real estate agents were candid.

“I’m sorry, Doctor,” he remembered one telling him, “but I have to eat, and I’d lose my job for selling to a nonwhite.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/03/sports/sammy-lee-dies-asian-american-olympic-gold.html

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